Dr. Mohammed Kaleel photo

Dr. Mohammed Kaleel

Emergency Room Radiology

We recently caught up with Saba University graduate Dr. Mohammed Kaleel, who we profiled in 2016 prior to entering his fellowship at Stanford in Musculoskeletal Radiology. He is happy to report that the fellowship year was incredible and far exceeded his expectations, calling it “the greatest educational year” of his life. Dr. Kaleel worked alongside brilliant minds in Radiology, and had the opportunity to participate in the care of professional athletes from the NBA, NFL, MLS, and the Olympics.

In additional to the excellent clinical training he received, Dr. Kaleel was also able to work on exciting academic projects at the intersection of technology and healthcare, a passion and skill we covered previously that led to the development of a former #1 iOs app in Medicine and accrued over 3 million users. One of the projects he worked on during fellowship is the sum of decades of research at Stanford University. Dr. Kaleel and his mentors at Stanford University created a web app that aids in diagnosing bone tumors on x-rays using computer intelligence analyzing attributes from over 10,000 cataloged bone tumor cases. 

After fellowship, Dr. Kaleel landed a bona fide dream job through his fellowship network at Stanford University. He was invited to join a very exclusive, invitation-only teleradiology group composed predominantly of Radiology graduates from Stanford University and Johns Hopkins, where he covers Emergency Room radiology remotely from the comfort of his home.  Vision Radiology covers the satellite hospitals of several top academic centers in the country. On top of covering emergency rooms around the country, Dr. Kaleel also serves as a Musculoskeletal Radiology consultant, where he offers second opinions to other radiologists on complex musculoskeletal imaging. 

Through Vision Radiology, Dr. Kaleel is able to do all of this high-level work on a flexible schedule and from anywhere in the world. Although he is primarily based in the San Francisco Bay Area, he has taken advantage of his location freedom to travel the world. In the last 6 months, he has worked out of Europe, Asia, Australia, and Hawaii. Dr. Kaleel intends to use this opportunity for more than just visiting exotic locations around the world as a tourist. One of his primary motives is to use this opportunity to do humanitarian medical work with underserved populations. 

Dr. Kaleel has used his flexible schedule for more than just dream travel and humanitarian work. He has been busy working on a healthcare startup with fellow colleagues from Stanford University on an innovative new tool for Radiology that they will be announcing in the near future. On top of all this work in such a short time since fellowship, Dr. Kaleel has found time for one more endeavor for now, he was recently appointed as an Adjunct Clinical Faculty in Musculoskeletal Radiology at Stanford University School of Medicine.