Forty years ago, Canada enjoyed one of the best physician-to-population ratios among developed countries. That's not the case today.
Among the 34 countries that are part of the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development, Canada now ranks 28th.

What happened? Andrei V. Malko, a student at Saba University School of Medicine, decided to find out. He made the shortage of doctors in Canada the focus for the research paper that is required of all Saba students.

And now Andrei has joined the select group of Saba students who have had their papers published—his paper, Physician Shortage in Canada: A Review of Contributing Factors, appears in the Global Journal of Health Science, Published by the Canadian Center of Science and Education.

 “Assessing medical data is a critical skill for any physician today,” said Jim Bruzik, Associate Dean for Medical Education at Saba.  ”Since we made the research module part of the Saba curriculum, students tell us it gives them a real point of differentiation in their residency interviews. This is especially the case for students like Andrei and others who have had their papers published.”

Andrei looked at a wide range of underlying factors impacting Canada’s physician shortage from government policies and population demographics to medical student career preferences and the decline in physician productivity. Understanding the wide range of underlying causes is critical because, he notes, “decisions that are made today will take at least a decade to reveal their full effect.”

To see Andrei’s’ published paper, click here.  To learn more about the student research program at Saba, including video interviews with Dean Bruzik and other Saba graduates who have had their papers published, go here on the Saba website